For any Inquiries or Questions

Issues with the content of the Code of Conduct should be directed to the current MRIA Chair of the Standards Portfolio, Amy Charles, CMRP, at Amy.Charles@Ipsos.com.


February 13, 2017
Qualitative Research Registry – QRR

The Respondent Tracking System in Canada

What is QRR?

QRR is a system for tracking the participation of respondents in qualitative interviews and focus groups across Canada. It highlights any undesirable respondents as reported by moderators or recruiters as those who we do not want to invite to any future interviews or focus groups. As well, a respondent may request to not be contacted again for any market research studies—and in this use, it serves as a “do not call” list.

How does it work?

Every month, recruiting firms in each city submit the names and phone numbers of all respondents who attended a group or interview during the past month.

This easy-to-use system allows each participating firm to receive a monthly list of “do not recruit again” respondents. While one recruiting firm can easily monitor the participation of respondents in their own database, it is impossible to ascertain whether a respondent has attended for another firm in the past month or the past six months. When each recruiting firm submits their attendees at the end of each month to QRR, they are cross-referenced and abusers are highlighted. QRR cross-checks by phone number and first and last names, even if the name is similar (i.e. Brown/Browne). If a match is found in any of the three categories, the name goes on the “do not recruit again” list. This list is sent monthly to all recruiting firms who regularly submit to QRR in Canada.

What are the Benefits of QRR to Qualitative Researchers?

The MRIA–QRD Board oversees QRR, and maintains its participation and commitment to excellence and self-monitoring for qualitative researchers. It has been ongoing since 1982, and is the only system of its kind in the world. The fact that the data is maintained by MRIA gives legitimacy and security to the industry, as well as maintaining privacy for the respondents.

Although we cannot capture every single respondent who may lie to get into qualitative studies, QRR at the very least provides a safety net to eliminate 90% of them. It is only successful through the cooperative efforts of the recruiting firms in Canada. QRR is available across Canada.

MRIA Rules of Conduct and Good Practice, Section C Qualitative Research, Qualitative Research Registry:

20. Where Qualitative Research Registry exists, recruiters should provide accurate data to these on a consistent basis and check all respondents against Qualitative Research Registry.

21. Moderators buying recruiting services should give primary consideration to recruiting agencies which submit to Qualitative Research Registry on a regular and ongoing basis, where such a service exists.

Therefore, any recruiters who are not listed did not submit any of their respondent names for that month. If they did some recruiting during that specific month, they have negatively affected the QRR system as well as their clients.

Recruiters do not want to unintentionally recruit professional or bad respondents who may not qualify. The QRR system allows the recruiters to purge their database of these undesirables. This enables the recruiter to avoid the existing professional respondents and work toward stopping any future ones. Participating firms will definitively be able to provide better-quality respondents to their clients.

Recruiting firms pay per each name submitted to QRR. This money goes toward maintaining the database and providing monthly updates. Although the cost is probably not a barrier to participation by any firm, it again is an example of the commitment that the recruiters have made to maintain this system in Canada.

Could QRR be improved?

Since its inception in 1982 as Central Files, other than moving from a manual system to a computerized sorting system, QRR has changed very little in how it performs or operates. There are several suggestions floating around that need to be addressed by the QRD Board in order for QRR to be improved and made even more useful for all users.

To find out more about QRR, or how to submit or report poor respondents who should not be invited to participate again, contact: Erica Kline, MRIA (416) 642-9793 x 8727


February 03, 2017

The MRIA is seeking candidates for positions on the Associations 2017-2019 Board of Directors.

Nominees must submit a 2017-2019 MRIA NATIONAL BOARD NOMINATION FORM signed by members-in-good-standing of the Association who are not members of the MRIA Board of Directors, and also signed by the nominee, to indicate acceptance of the nomination.

The deadline for submission of completed Nomination Forms and Candidate Statements is Friday, March 17th, 2017 at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

En français


December 22, 2014

MRIA 2015 Standards – revised

Announcement of MRIA’s new Code of Conduct and new Research Neutrals Advisory Service

In this milestone announcement, MRIA advises that your Association has updated its professional Code of Conduct, to align with the fundamental principles of the International Code on Market and Social Research (the “ESOMAR Code”).

ESOMAR is a worldwide association of research professionals. It promotes standards for research and professional ethics endorsed by members in over 130 countries who share and uphold the conviction that “market research depends for its success on public confidence – that is carried out honestly, objectively and without unwelcome intrusion or disadvantage to its participants.”

MRIA’s Code of Conduct is self-regulatory and intended to reflect the standard of “best practice” in Canada, providing explicit assurance of consumer protection in how the industry interacts with and serves the Canadian public.  MRIA’s newly introduced Code of Conduct replaces MRIA’s previous Code of Conduct and Good Practices (dated December, 2007).

Please consult the new Code of Conduct whenever need arises, and let us know of any difficulties in understanding or applying its specific content. Your comments will be submitted to the Standards Committee, and any clarifications found to be necessary will be made in the first part of 2015.  Notification will be given on the website of the latest updates. 

Celebrate with us this new era of internationally harmonized standards. We are proud to be a part of it.

 

Kara Mitchelmore, MBA, FCPA, FCMA, CMRP

MRIA CEO

Shane Skillen, CMRP

MRIA Chair

Ruth Corbin

MRIA Standards Chair

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Appendix A1 - Complaints Adjudication Procedure
  3. Appendix A2 - Complaints Adjudication Procedure Schedule (part 1)
  4. Appendix A3 - Complaints Adjudication Procedure Schedule (part 2)
  5. Appendix A4 - Complaints Adjudication Procedure Schedule (part 3)
  6. Appendix B - Mobile Marketing Research
  7. Appendix C - Social Media Research
  8. Appendix D - Scientific Integrity
  9. Appendix E - Qualitative Guidelines
  10. Appendix F - Guideline on Passive Data Collection and Observation of Human Behaviour
  11. Appendix G - Commissioning Research
  12. Appendix H - Mystery Shopping
  13. Appendix I - Online Research
  14. Appendix J - Distinguishing Research
  15. Appendix K - Interviewing Children and Young People
  16. Appendix L - Polling Standards
  17. Appendix M - Mutual Rights and Responsibilities
  18. Appendix N - Expert Evidence Standards